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English Vocabulary - Từ vựng | Everyday vocabulary | Eating Vocabulary
 

Useful Vocabulary


knife(knives)knife fork(s)fork spoon(s)spoon teaspoon(s)teaspoon


 

plate(s)plate bowl(s)bowl cup(s)cup saucer(s)saucer


 

table(s)table chair(s)chair

glass(es)glass
tablecloth(s)tablecloth
 

tablemat(s) / placemat(s)table mat
 

napkin(s) / serviette(s)serviette

Eating out vocabulary
waiter(s)
waitress(es)
chef(s)
waiter waitress chef
 
menu(s)
 
  menu  
wine glass(es)
 
bottle(s)
glass   bottle
 
candle(s)
 
  candle  
bill(s)
Pay
tip(s) / gratuity(gratuities)
bill credit card tip
 
taxi(s)
 
  taxi  

 

Mealtimes
Early Morning (am) - Breakfast
Mid Morning (11.00 am) - Brunch - a mixture of breakfast and lunch (US) / Elevenses - a light snack (UK)
Noon (12.00 ish) - Lunch
Evening (pm) - Dinner / Tea / High Tea (very old fashioned)
Night (pm) - Supper

Places to Eat Out

Cafe
Snack Bar
Fast Food Restaurant
Pub
Bistro
Restaurant
Hotel Restaurant
 

Parts of a Menu

Starters/Appetizers/Entrees/Hors D'oeuvres
Soups
Main Courses (Meat/Fish/Vegetarian)
Desserts

Beverages (Coffee etc.)
Wine/Drinks List (sometimes on a separate menu)

 

Naturally Speaking

Sometimes there are things you like or don't like or even things you don't eat.

I eat I like
I don't eat I don't like
Things you do eat / like.
Things you don't eat / like.
I like fruit. I don't like fruit.
I love spinach. I hate spinach.
I'm a vegetarian, I only eat fruit and vegetables. I'm a vegetarian, I don't eat meat or fish.
I have allergies, but I can eat fruit. I have allergies, so I can't eat anything containing nuts.
I eat fish on Friday, for religious reasons. I don't eat pork, for religious reasons.

Dialogue

Here we have two conversations between Mrs Smith and her younger son John:
It's 7am and John is still in bed. John's mother must leave for work.
Mrs S: Get up John or you'll be late for school!
John: I'm getting up mum.
Mrs S: Well come down stairs and have your breakfast.
John: Can I have cereal and toast?
Mrs S: Yes if you hurry, I have to leave for work.
John: Morning mum.
Mrs S: Fetch a chair and sit at the table, there's a bowl of cereal, a plate of toast and a cup of tea. You'll have to get your own cutlery. I've got to go now, I'll see you tonight, bye.
John: Bye mum.
It's 5pm and John's mother has just come home from work.
John: What's for dinner tonight mum?
Mrs S: What do you fancy?
John: Fish and chips would be nice.
Mrs S: What did you have for lunch at school?
John: Pizza and chips.
Mrs S: Well how about a nice healthy salad then?
John: Oh. Well ok, can I help?
Mrs S: Yes you can set the table. Set it for 3, your father should be home any minute.
John: Should I put spoons and bowls out?
Mrs S: No we won't have a starter, just put out plates and knives and forks, we'll have fruit for pudding. We'll need cups and saucers too, your father will want a cup of tea when he comes in.
John: I want to invite Mark for tea on Saturday. Can he come.
Mrs S: Yes of course, as long as it's ok with his mother.

Naturally Speaking

Booking a Table Placing Your Order Complaining
  • I'd like to reserve / book a table for four at 8pm, please.
  • I'd like to reserve / book a table for a party of six at 8pm, please.
  • I'd like to book a table for two at 8 in the name of Hand, please.
  • Could we have a table by the window, please?
  • Could we have a non-smoking table, please?
  • Could we have a table away from the kitchen/toilets, please?
  • Could we have a booth, please?
  • Could you make sure it's a quiet table, please?
  • I'd like the .............., please.
  • For starters I'll have the soup and for the main course I'd like the roast beef.
  • Could I have chips instead of new potatoes, please?
  • What is the house special today?
  • Is there anything you would recommend?
  • Could I see the wine menu, please?
  • I'll have a bottle of the South African Cabernet Sauvignon.
  • I'll have a glass of house red/white, please.
  • Which wine would you recommend?
  • Excuse me, but my meal is cold.
  • Excuse me, we've been waiting for over half an hour for our drinks.
  • I'm sorry but I ordered the side salad not the vegetables.
  • Excuse me this steak is over done, I ordered rare.
  • I'm afraid this wine tastes corked.
  • Excuse me this wine isn't chilled properly.
Arriving at the Restaurant
During/After the Meal
Paying
  • Good evening, the name is Hand. I have a table booked for six.
  • Do you have the menu in English/German/French ..., please?
  • Do you have a high chair for young children, please?
  • Could we have a table over there, please?
  • I'm sorry but I asked for a table by the window.
  • Could we have an extra chair, please?
  • Could we have some more bread, please?
  • Do you have a pepper mill?
  • Could I have some dressing, please?
  • Could you pass me the salt, please?
  • That was delicious. My compliments to the chef.
  • Could I have the bill, please?
  • Do you take Visa?
  • We'd like separate bills, please.
  • Is service included?
  • No, please. This is on me. (When you wish to pay for everyone.)

Dialogue

Mr and Mrs Smith are out celebrating their wedding anniversary.
It's 8pm. Mr Smith (Jack) and Mrs Smith (Jill) are celebrating their 10th wedding anniversary. They have just arrived at the restaurant.
Mr Smith: Well here we are. What do you think?
Mrs Smith: It's lovely Jack. Are you sure we can afford it?
Mr Smith: Well I may have to do some washing up, but you're worth it.
  The waiter arrives.
Waiter: Good evening sir, madame.
Mr Smith: Good evening. We have a reservation for a table for two in the name of Smith.
Waiter: Yes sir. May I take your coats?
 
  Waiter takes their coats and hangs them up.
Mr & Mrs Smith: Thank you.
Waiter: Your welcome. Would you like to come to the table or would you prefer to order in the bar?
Mr Smith: I wouldn't mind an aperitif. We'll order in the bar.
Waiter: Please follow me, I'll bring you the menu in a moment.

Mr & Mrs Smith order their drinks at the bar and sit down to look at the menu.

Mrs Smith: Oh dear Jack, it's all in French!
Mr Smith: Well that's what we're paying for. Don't worry I've got an idea.
Waiter: Are you ready to order sir?
Mr Smith: Not really. Could you recommend something.
Waiter: Certainly sir. The fresh lobster is particularly good this evening, and for starters may I recommend a light consomme?
Mr Smith: Sounds lovely, what do you think dear?
Mrs Smith: Oh yes, I love lobster.
 
Waiter: So, that's two consomme and two lobsters. Would you like to look at the wine menu?
Mr Smith: Why don't you bring us what you think will go best. Nothing too expensive though.
Waiter: No problem sir. I'll call you as soon as your table is ready.
  The waiter walks away.
Mrs Smith: You are clever Jack, but what about dessert.
Mr Smith: Don't worry, they bring round a sweet trolley, so we just point at what we fancy!
A while later Mr & Mrs Smith have finished eating and are drinking their coffee.
Waiter: Was everything to your satisfaction?
Mr & Mrs Smith Yes, lovely thank you.
Mr Smith: The whole meal was delicious, our compliments to the chef. Unfortunately we have to be back for the baby-sitter so could we pay now?
Waiter: Certainly sir, I'll bring you the bill. Would you like me to order you a taxi.
Mr Smith: Yes that would be great, thank you.
Mrs Smith: What a nice man, we must leave him a good tip.
Mr Smith: Yes of course.

Verbs and Phrasal Verbs About Eating

Verbs

The Verb (infinitive form) The Meaning An example
( Simple Past Tense)
Regular
/Irregular
To binge To eat more than is good for you. (Often associated with eating disorders.) (Rarely used in conversation) Regular
To bite To tear, cut or grip food with the teeth. He bit into the apple. Irregular
To breakfast To eat breakfast. (Rarely used in conversation.) Regular
To chew To work food between the jaws and teeth (see also masticate) He chewed his food well. Regular
To consume See to eat. (Rarely used in conversation.) Regular
To digest What happens to food after it is swallowed. (Not something you do consciously.) (Rarely used in conversation.) Regular
To dine To eat dinner. Especially related to eating out. They dined at their friend's house. Regular
To eat
The complete action of putting food in the mouth and then biting, chewing and swallowing it. She ate her dinner. Irregular
To feast To eat a lot or to enjoy eating something. (Often something out of the ordinary.) They feasted on caviar and salmon. Regular
To gobble To eat or swallow food too quickly and in large amounts. The little boy gobbled his sandwich. Regular
To guzzle To eat food greedily. He guzzled his lunch. Regular
To ingest To take food into the body. (Rarely used in conversation.) Regular
To lick To pass the tongue over food in order to taste or consume it. She licked the ice cream. Regular
To lunch To eat lunch. (Rarely used in conversation.) Regular
To munch To chew food steadily, especially with a crunchy noise, such as when eating an apple. He munched the apple. Regular
To nibble To take small repeated bites of food. The rabbit nibbled on the carrot. Regular
To snack To eat a light meal, or eat between main meals. She snacked on biscuits and sweets all day. Regular
To swallow The act of passing food from the mouth to the stomach. She swallowed a fish bone. Regular
To taste To take a small amount of food in the mouth and test it. He tasted the soup before he added more salt. Regular
To wolf To eat food quickly. (Often followed by down.) He wolfed down his breakfast. Regular

Verbs and Phrasal Verbs About Eating

Verbs

The Verb (infinitive form) The Meaning An example
( Simple Past Tense)
Regular
/Irregular
To binge To eat more than is good for you. (Often associated with eating disorders.) (Rarely used in conversation) Regular
To bite To tear, cut or grip food with the teeth. He bit into the apple. Irregular
To breakfast To eat breakfast. (Rarely used in conversation.) Regular
To chew To work food between the jaws and teeth (see also masticate) He chewed his food well. Regular
To consume See to eat. (Rarely used in conversation.) Regular
To digest What happens to food after it is swallowed. (Not something you do consciously.) (Rarely used in conversation.) Regular
To dine To eat dinner. Especially related to eating out. They dined at their friend's house. Regular
To eat
The complete action of putting food in the mouth and then biting, chewing and swallowing it. She ate her dinner. Irregular
To feast To eat a lot or to enjoy eating something. (Often something out of the ordinary.) They feasted on caviar and salmon. Regular
To gobble To eat or swallow food too quickly and in large amounts. The little boy gobbled his sandwich. Regular
To guzzle To eat food greedily. He guzzled his lunch. Regular
To ingest To take food into the body. (Rarely used in conversation.) Regular
To lick To pass the tongue over food in order to taste or consume it. She licked the ice cream. Regular
To lunch To eat lunch. (Rarely used in conversation.) Regular
To munch To chew food steadily, especially with a crunchy noise, such as when eating an apple. He munched the apple. Regular
To nibble To take small repeated bites of food. The rabbit nibbled on the carrot. Regular
To snack To eat a light meal, or eat between main meals. She snacked on biscuits and sweets all day. Regular
To swallow The act of passing food from the mouth to the stomach. She swallowed a fish bone. Regular
To taste To take a small amount of food in the mouth and test it. He tasted the soup before he added more salt. Regular
To wolf To eat food quickly. (Often followed by down.) He wolfed down his breakfast. Regular

Phrasal Verbs

The Phrasal Verb The Meaning An example
( Simple Past Tense)
S=Separable
I=Inseparable
eat out To go out to eat, usually to a restaurant. They were both tired so they ate out. I
eat up To eat everything on your plate. He was very hungry and ate everything up. S
tuck in To eat with enthusiasm. He enthusiastically tucked in to his dinner. I

Idioms and Sayings About Eating

Idiom/Saying Explanation
"Chew the fat."

For example:

"I enjoy meeting my friends to chew the fat."
To chat.
"Coffee break."

For example:

"I usually have a coffee break around 10.30 am."
To take a short break from work to rest and drink coffee, smoke a cigarette etc..
"Eat dirt"

For example:

"He bullied his employees and made them eat dirt."
To act humble, accept another`s insult or bad treatment.
"Eat humble pie."

For example:

"She had to eat humble pie when he proved she was wrong."
To be humbled, admit one`s error and apologize.
"Eat like a pig."

For example:

"He has terrible table manners, he eats like a pig."
To have bad table manners.
"Eat like a horse."

For example:

"She has a very healthy appetite, she eats like a horse."
To have a good appetite.

"Eat one`s words"

For example:

"I'd told him off but had to eat my words, when he proved I was wrong."
To take back something one has said, admit something is not true.
"To have one's cake and eat it."

For example:

"He was never at home, but was surprised when she left him. He always wanted to have his cake and eat it."
To do/eat/use something until it is gone and still not want to give it up.
"Go Dutch"

For example:-

"It's usually better to go Dutch on a first date."

To share the bill for a meal or a night out. Each person pays for what they have eaten or the bill is simply split.
"Out to lunch."

For example:

"I always thought she acted strangely, she was totally out to lunch."
To behave crazily or madly.
"Suck up"

For example:

"I never liked her, she was always sucking up to the boss."

To be really nice to someone in order to gain favour.
"Tea break."

For example:

"Do you want to come with me for a cigarette on our tea break?"
To take a short break from work to rest and drink tea, smoke a cigarette etc..
 

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